Lets Encourage Politicians and Diplomats to Work Toward Securing a Global Pact Calling for a Permanent Global Cease Fire and A Lasting Truce On Earth

Inspired by the Kellogg Briand Pact signed of 1928 signed renouncing war after world war one I suggest we can return to this agreement and think logically how we can solve problems if war would not be an option on the table. We could put the interventions in place needed to make it possible to solve conflicts only through pacific means.

Humanity lost our way after signing this pact and reverted back to fighting. Just think of how many lives would have been saved had this pact actually have been kept and if we did not have any wars after 1928. We must reopen the global conversation calling for peace in our time. We can achieve peace if we have a road map to get there. This is a great first step. I suggest that this pact or a newly written Global Truce/ Global Cease Fire Pact be committed to by each country on the Earth beginning country by country starting with the country considered the most peaceful on the Global Peace Index ( See: http://www.visionofhumanity.org/
http://www.visionofhumanity.org/info-center/global-peace-index-2011/

If humanity can go peaceful for the first time in our species existence it will be a great accomplishment that we can be very proud of ourselves for achieving. We can avert the possibility of entering into a World War III and a risk of a possible extinction of much of the life on Earth. We have come so far in our history on this Planet. We have accomplished so much. We have brilliance among us to have analyzed the genome, to have sent probes to the far reaches in the Universe but we still can not seem to get along. We have to break through the problems and just use our brains and figure out how to resolve these conflicts without the use of force or war or exploitation of human rights. We have to figure this out so we can hand the world over to our children grandchildren and great grandchildren on the right path for survival and peaceful collaborative measures in place. As technology advances the world will become much more dangerous. We have to ask ourselves where is this all going and why. We have to peacefully change so we can survive and keep life alive. We have to help each other live better not kill each other. We are all cousins. We are all one family of humans and we are having one hell of a family feud but we have to get a better perspective on this and calculate the ecological footprint of war on the environment. How are we going to clean up the mess we have already made over the past centuries of war. We have detonated 2000 atomic tests
Please see http://www.ctbto.org/specials/1945-1998-by-isao-hashimoto/
see: http://www.ctbto.org/?Fsize=myovnvtqsr
http://www.ctbto.org/nuclear-testing/history-of-nuclear-testing/nuc...
http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/imt/kbpact.htm

Humanity has dropped millions of pounds of chemicals, bombs, and has bombs and landmine that are still going off from past wars http://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/201101/laos.aspx We need to clean up this mess safely. There is a TED Talk that discusses how Rats are used to sniff out landmines.

http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/bart_weetjens_how_i_taught_rats_t...

http://www.policyinnovations.org/ideas/briefings/data/000081 http://www.army.mil/article/63473/

 

Fortunately there has been a campaign to ban landmines http://www.icbl.org/intro.php and 156 countries have signed this agreement thus far but US has not yet signed the treaty. You may ask Pres. Obama to sign this international treaty 

http://www.kintera.org/c.nlIWIgN2JwE/b.5543975/k.A24D/US_Ban_Landmi...

To see the progress each country has made in the area of compliance with the provisions of the agreement please see http://www.icbl.org/index.php/icbl/content/view/full/23567 

 

There is a movement called Global Zero calling for a world without nuclear weapons:

http://www.globalzero.org/files/pdf/gzap_3.0.pdf

http://www.brookings.edu/opinions/2010/0504_global_zero_ohanlon.aspx

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/11/global-zero-nuclear-power_...

 

We have to make a comprehensive global multinational multidisciplinary plan as to how to attain peace.  Please write to your government officials and advocate policies of peace and suggest ideas as to how to attain global peace. We are all global citizens. http://www.globalcitizens.org/ 

 

 

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Kellogg-Briand Pact 1928
Art 1
Art 2
Art 3

Treaty between the United States and other Powers providing for the renunciation of war as an instrument of national policy. Signed at Paris, August 27, 1928; ratification advised by the Senate, January 16, 1929; ratified by the President, January 17, 1929; instruments of ratification deposited at Washington by the United States of America, Australia, Dominion of Canada, Czechoslovkia, Germany, Great Britain, India, Irish Free State, Italy, New Zealand, and Union of South Africa, March 2, 1929: By Poland, March 26, 1929; by Belgium, March 27 1929; by France, April 22, 1929; by Japan, July 24, 1929; proclaimed, July 24, 1929.
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.
A PROCLAMATION.
WHEREAS a Treaty between the President of the United States Of America, the President of the German Reich, His Majesty the King of the Belgians, the President of the French Republic, His Majesty the King of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, His Majesty the King of Italy, His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, the President of the Republic of Poland, and the President of the Czechoslovak Republic, providing for the renunciation of war as an instrument of national policy, was concluded and signed by their respective Plenipotontiaries at Paris on the twenty-seventh day of August, one thousand nine hundred and twenty-eight, the original of which Treaty, being in the English and the French languages, is word for word as follows:
THE PRESIDENT OF THE GERMAN REICH, THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF THE BELGIANS, THE PRESIDENT OF THE FRENCH REPUBLIC, HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF GREAT BRITAIN IRELAND AND THE BRITISH DOMINIONS BEYOND THE SEAS, EMPEROR OF INDIA, HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF ITALY, HIS MAJESTY THE EMPEROR OF JAPAN, THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF POLAND THE PRESIDENT OF THE CZECHOSLOVAK REPUBLIC,
Deeply sensible of their solemn duty to promote the welfare of mankind;
Persuaded that the time has, come when a frank renunciation of war as an instrument of national policy should be made to the end that the peaceful and friendly relations now existing between their peoples may be perpetuated;
Convinced that all changes in their relations with one another should be sought only by pacific means and be the result of a peaceful and orderly process, and that any signatory Power which shall hereafter seek to promote its ts national interests by resort to war a should be denied the benefits furnished by this Treaty;
Hopeful that, encouraged by their example, all the other nations of the world will join in this humane endeavor and by adhering to the present Treaty as soon as it comes into force bring their peoples within the scope of its beneficent provisions, thus uniting the civilized nations of the world in a common renunciation of war as an instrument of their national policy;
Have decided to conclude a Treaty and for that purpose have appointed as their respective
Plenipotentiaries:
THE PRESIDENT OF THE GERMAN REICH:
Dr Gustav STRESEMANN, Minister of Foreign Affairs;
THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:
The Honorable Frank B. KELLOGG, Secretary of State;
HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF THE BELGIANS:
Mr Paul HYMANS, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Minister of State;
THE PRESIDENT OF THE FRENCH REPUBLIC:
Mr. Aristide BRIAND Minister for Foreign Affairs;
HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF GREAT BRITAIN, IRELAND AND THE BRITISH DOMINIONS BEYOND THE SEAS, EMPEROR OF INDIA:
For GREAT BRITAIN and NORTHERN IBELAND and all parts of the British Empire which are not separate Members of the League of Nations:
The Right Honourable Lord CUSHENDUN, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, Acting-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs;
For the DOMINION OF CANADA:
The Right Honourable William Lyon MACKENZIE KING, Prime Minister and Minister for External Affairs;
For the COMMONWEALTH of AUSTRLIA:
The Honourable Alexander John McLACHLAN, Member of the Executive Federal Council;
For the DOMINION OF NEW ZEALAND:
The Honourable Sir Christopher James PARR High Commissioner for New Zealand in Great Britain;
For the UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA:
The Honourable Jacobus Stephanus SMIT, High Commissioner for the Union of South Africa in Great Britain;
For the IRISH FREE STATE:
Mr. William Thomas COSGRAVE, President of the Executive Council;
For INDIA:
The Right Honourable Lord CUSHENDUN, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, Acting Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs;
HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF ITALY:
Count Gaetano MANZONI, his Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary at Paris.
HIS MAJESTY THE EMPEROR OF JAPAN:
Count UCHIDA, Privy Councillor;
THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF POLAND:
Mr. A. ZALESKI, Minister for Foreign Affairs;
THE PRESIDENT OF THE CZECHOSLOVAK REPUBLIC:
Dr Eduard BENES, Minister for Foreign Affairs;
who, having communicated to one another their full powers found in good and due form have agreed upon the following articles:
ARTICLE I
The High Contracting Parties solemly declare in the names of their respective peoples that they condemn recourse to war for the solution of international controversies, and renounce it, as an instrument of national policy in their relations with one another.
ARTICLE II
The High Contracting Parties agree that the settlement or solution of all disputes or conflicts of whatever nature or of whatever origin they may be, which may arise among them, shall never be sought except by pacific means.
ARTICLE III
The present Treaty shall be ratified by the High Contracting Parties named in the Preamble in accordance with their respective constitutional requirements, and shall take effect as between them as soon as all their several instruments of ratification shall have been deposited at Washington.
This Treaty shall, when it has come into effect as prescribed in the preceding paragraph, remain open as long as may be necessary for adherence by all the other Powers of the world. Every instrument evidencing the adherence of a Power shall be deposited at Washington and the Treaty shall immediately upon such deposit become effective as; between the Power thus adhering and the other Powers parties hereto.
It shall be the duty of the Government of the United States to fumish each Government named in the Preamble and every Government subsequently adhering to this Treaty with a certified copy of the Treaty and of every instrument of ratification or adherence. It shall also be the duty of the Government of the United States telegraphically to notify such Governments immediately upon the deposit with it of each instrument of ratification or adherence.
IN FAITH WHEREOF the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this Treaty in the French and English languages both texts having equal force, and hereunto affix their seals.
DONE at Paris, the twenty seventh day of August in the year one thousand nine hundred and twenty-eight.
[SEAL] GUSTAV STRESEMANN
[SEAL] FRANK B KELLOGG
[SEAL] PAUL HYMANS
[SEAL] ARI BRIAND
[SEAL] CUSHENDUN
[SEAL] W. L. MACKENZIE KING
[SEAL] A J MCLACHLAN
[SEAL] C. J. PARR
[SEAL] J S. SMIT
[SEAL] LIAM T.MACCOSGAIR
[SEAL] CUSHENDUN
[SEAL] G. MANZONI
[SEAL] UCHIDA
[SEAB] AUGUST ZALESKI
[SEAE1 DR EDWARD BENES
Certified to be a true copy of the signed original deposited with the Government of the United States of America.
FRANK B. KELLOGG
Secretary of State of the United States of America
AND WHEREAS it is stipulated in the said Treaty that it shall take effect as between the High Contracting Parties as soon as all the several instruments of ratification shall have been deposited at Washington;
AND WHEREAS the said Treaty has been duly ratified on the parts of all the High Contracting Parties and their several instruments of ratification have been deposited with the Government of the United States of America, the last on July 24, 1929;
NOW THEREFORE, be it known that I, Herbert Hoover, President of the United States of America, have caused the said Treaty to be made public, to the end that the same and every article and clause thereof may be observed and fulfilled with good faith by the United States and the citizens thereof.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.
DONE at the city of Washington this twenty-fourth day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and twenty-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and fifty-fourth
HERBERT HOOVER
By the President:
HENRY L STIMSON
Secretary of State
NOTE BY THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE
ADHERING COUNTRIES
When this Treaty became effective on Jury 24, 1929, the instruments of ratification of all of the signatory powers having been deposited at Washington, the following countries, having deposited instruments of definitive adherence, became parties to it:
Afghanistan Finland Peru
Albania Guatemala Portugal
Austria Hungary Rumania
Bulgaria Iceland Russia
China Latvia Kingdom of the Serbs
Cuba Liberia Croats and Slovenes
Denmark Lithuania Siam
Dominican Republic Netherlands Spain
Egypt Nicaragua Sweden
Estonia Norway Turkey
Ethiopia Panama
Additional adhesions deposited subsequent to July 24, 1929. Persia, July 2, 1929; Greece, August 3, 1929; Honduras, August 6, 1929; Chile, August 12, 1929; Luxemburg August 14, 1929; Danzig, September 11, 1929; Costa Rica, October 1, 1929; Venezuela, October 24, 1929.
Source:
United States Statutes at Large
Vol 46 Part 2 Page 2343

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An Electronic Publication of the Avalon Project - William C. Fray and Lisa A. Spar, Co-Directors
Copyright 1996 The Avalon Project
________________________________________________________________
http://www.visionofhumanity.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/2011-GPI...

A N A LY S I S O F T H E R E S U LT S
Global Peace Index rankings
Table 2 contains the GPI rankings for 153 countries in 2011. Those countries shaded green are in the top 20%; those
shaded in red are in the bottom 20%. All comparisons in country ranks with the 2010 GPI have been made on the
basis of the 149 countries that were included last year, thus excluding the fi ve countries added in 2011.
Table 2 (continued over page)Page 9
Rank Country Score
81 Gabon 2.059
82 United States of America 2.063
83 Bangladesh 2.070
84 Serbia 2.071
85 Peru 2.077
86 Cameroon 2.104
87 Angola 2.109
88 Guyana 2.112
89 Montenegro 2.113
90 Ecuador 2.116
91 Dominican Republic 2.125
92 Guinea 2.126
93 Kazakhstan 2.137
94 Papua New Guinea 2.139
95 Nepal 2.152
96 Liberia 2.159
96 Uganda 2.159
98 Congo (Brazzaville) 2.165
99 Rwanda 2.185
100 Mali 2.188
101 Saudi Arabia 2.192
102 El Salvador 2.215
103 Tajikistan 2.225
104 Eritrea 2.227
105 Madagascar 2.239
106 Jamaica 2.244
107 Thailand 2.247
108 Turkmenistan 2.248
109 Armenia 2.260
109 Uzbekistan 2.260
111 Kenya 2.276
112 Belarus 2.283
113 Haiti 2.288
114 Kyrgyz Republic 2.296
115 Cambodia 2.301
116 Syria 2.322
117 Honduras 2.327
119 Iran 2.356
119 Niger 2.356
121 Mexico 2.362
122 Azerbaijan 2.379
Rank Country Score
123 Bahrain 2.398
124 Venezuela 2.403
125 Guatemala 2.405
126 Sri Lanka 2.407
127 Turkey 2.411
128 Cote d’ Ivoire 2.417
129 Algeria 2.423
130 Mauritania 2.425
131 Ethiopia 2.468
132 Burundi 2.532
133 Myanmar 2.538
134 Georgia 2.558
135 India 2.570
136 Philippines 2.574
137 Lebanon 2.597
138 Yemen 2.670
139 Colombia 2.700
140 Zimbabwe 2.722
141 Chad 2.740
142 Nigeria 2.743
143 Libya 2.816
144 Central African Republic 2.869
145 Israel 2.901
146 Pakistan 2.905
147 Russia 2.966
148 Democratic Republic of Congo 3.016
149 North Korea 3.092
150 Afghanistan 3.212
151 Sudan 3.223
152 Iraq 3.296
153 Somalia 3.379Page 10
A N A LY S I S O F T H E R E S U LT S
A regional overview
Western Europe remains markedly the most peaceful
region, with the majority of the countries in this group
ranking in the top 20 overall. The average GPI score
in 2011 for the region deteriorated for the second
successive year, but by a slightly smaller margin than
between 2009 and 2010. Taking average GPI scores
since the fi rst edition of the index in 2007 and adjusting
for the inclusion of additional countries, the region
became more peaceful up to 2009, since when it has
become less so. Four Nordic nations are ranked in the
GPI’s top ten, with high levels of safety and security
indicating broadly harmonious societies, free from civil
confl ict. Sweden ranks lower than its Nordic neighbours
on account of its thriving arms-manufacturing industry
and the volume of exports of conventional weapons.
Its score deteriorated owing to a rise in the number
of internal security offi cers and police and a rise in
the perception of terrorist acts (from a low base) and
it dropped out of the top ten to 13th position. As in
previous editions of the GPI, the majority of the Western
European nations recorded only small year-on year
changes to their scores. Iceland experienced the largest
improvement, as its political scene returned to stability
after the turmoil of 2008 and 2009 but also owing to a
drop in its level of military capability and sophistication
as austerity measures took their toll on an already small
military budget. Denmark’s score improved by the
second-largest margin in the region.
Greece’s score deteriorated for the third successive
year, and by the largest margin in the region with an
increasing risk of demonstrations and rises in the level
of violent crime linked to the ongoing fi nancial crisis
and high unemployment. Very large numbers of heavy
weapons per head in both Greece and Cyprus contribute
to their relatively high overall scores and low ranks. The
United Kingdom and France have been accorded low
positions compared with their neighbouring countries in
previous editions of the GPI owing to their sophisticated
military spheres, substantial arms exports, involvement
in external confl icts and relatively high homicide rates.
This year the UK’s score was unchanged, but it rose to
26th place as a result of deteriorations in the scores of
four countries ranked above it in 2010: Oman, Chile,
Costa Rica and Spain.
W

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Comment by Paudyal, Dhruba P. on October 25, 2011 at 8:58am

Dear Ms Michelle

Peace economics for each individual country is worrisome still leaderships are not convinced for a concerted effort. I think this message is a good reflection that time has come to form coalition and act more innovatively.

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