Ramu Manivannan
  • Male
  • Chennai, Tamil Nadu
  • India
  • Associate Professor, University of…
Share on Facebook
Share Twitter
  • Blog Posts
  • Discussions
  • Events
  • Groups
  • Photos
  • Photo Albums
  • Videos

Ramu Manivannan's Friends

  • Bhavin Vyas
  • Swarna Rajagopalan
  • Seth B. Cohen
  • Rene Wadlow
  • TeraDavis
  • Denis Matveev
  • Gianni Scotto
  • Jake Lynch
  • Craig Zelizer
 

Ramu Manivannan's Page

Latest Activity

K.B. THANGAVEL liked Ramu Manivannan's profile
Dec 15, 2011
Muhammad Tahir Tabassum left a comment for Ramu Manivannan
"Dear Ramu, Its my pleasure to visit your profile in peace network. We can be good friend and partner in future. Peace."
Apr 17, 2011
Bhavin Vyas left a comment for Ramu Manivannan
"Hello Professor Manivannan, Not sure if you got my message, but my email is vyas.bhavin10@gmail.com."
Jun 23, 2010
Ramu Manivannan left a comment for Bhavin Vyas
"Thank you very much, Bhavin. Do send me your e-mail address. Best wishes! Ramu Manivannan"
Jun 11, 2010
Ramu Manivannan and Bhavin Vyas are now friends
Jun 11, 2010
Jake Lynch and Ramu Manivannan are now friends
Dec 28, 2009
Ramu Manivannan is now friends with Gianni Scotto and Rene Wadlow
Aug 28, 2009
Rene Wadlow left a comment for Ramu Manivannan
"AN APPEAL TO CONTACTS IN INDIA TO EXPRESS COMPASSION BY CONTACTING THE SRI LANKAN AUTHORITIES FOR THE RESPECT OF HUMANITARIAN LAW Sri Lanka : The Last Round ? Rene Wadlow With the Sri Lankan government troops closing in to the remaining…"
Feb 15, 2009

Profile Information

Please feel free to provide a short bio about yourself or the work of your organization (no more than 3 paragraphs)
I am teacher and social activist for peace and justice
Please list the countries and/or regions in which you (or your organization) have direct and significant expertise
South Asia
Southeast Asia
Southern Africa
What is your current country of residence (or location of your organization)?
India
What is your current job (and organization) and/or where and what field are you studying?
Associate Professor, University of Madras, Chennai, India
What is your personal or organizational website?
http://r
Which are your primary sectoral areas of expertise (or the primary sectoral areas of your organization) ?
Alternative Dispute Resolution, Peacebuilding, Conflict Resolution, Democratization, Development, Education, Civil Society
Which are your primary skills areas(or the primary skill areas of your organization)?
Training, Intervention, Research
What are some of your current areas of research (if any)?
Sri Lanka, Burma(Myanmar), Nonviolence, Nonviolent Alternatives, Nonviolent Conflict Intervention,
If appropriate feel free to list several of your (or your organization's) publications
The Asian Future - Dialogues for Change(ed), Zed Books, London, 2005( 2 volumes); Freedom Behind Bars(on Burma), 2005

Comment Wall (6 comments)

You need to be a member of Peace and Collaborative Development Network to add comments!

Join Peace and Collaborative Development Network

At 2:21am on April 17, 2011, Muhammad Tahir Tabassum said…

Dear Ramu,

Its my pleasure to visit your profile in peace network.

We can be good friend and partner in future.

Peace.
At 1:53pm on June 23, 2010, Bhavin Vyas said…
Hello Professor Manivannan,

Not sure if you got my message, but my email is vyas.bhavin10@gmail.com.
At 1:51am on February 16, 2009, Rene Wadlow said…
AN APPEAL TO CONTACTS IN INDIA TO EXPRESS COMPASSION BY CONTACTING THE SRI LANKAN AUTHORITIES FOR THE RESPECT OF HUMANITARIAN LAW




Sri Lanka : The Last Round ?



Rene Wadlow



With the Sri Lankan government troops closing in to the remaining Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) stronghold, it looks as if this is the last round of a military struggle that began in 1983 but whose roots go back at least to independence in 1948. The ongoing conflict between the Sinhala and the Tamils that has ebbed and flowed derives its emotional force, in part, from competing beliefs that began during the colonial period about legitimate rule, economic wellbeing, and sacred authority.



The Office to the United Nations, Geneva, Association of World Citizens has had a long-standing concern with the conflict in Sri Lanka and has made frequent calls for good-faith negotiations on the political and administrative structure of the State. I had thought that reason would win out over the irrational drive to settle complicated issues of social-political structures through armed violence. I seem to have been wrong since both the government and the LTTE gave up negotiations in exchange for a military ‘solution’. A military victory seems now possible for the government forces.



There are two short-term dangers. There are some 200,000 people trapped between the LTTE militias and the government troops. There have been appeals from the United Nations and the International Committee of the Red Cross for a cease-fire so that civilians, especially the sick and wounded, can leave the fighting area. As this is being written (11 Feb. 2009), there is no cease-fire and none seems in view.



There have been calls from the Government to the LTTE leadership to lay down their arms and end the fighting. Again, this is a logical possibility, but given past LTTE willingness to fight to the bitter end, a massive rendition seems unlikely. Thus, there may be a heavy loss of life of those caught in the cross-fire.



The second danger is revenge killings on a large scale. The Tamil-Sinhalese conflict has been extremely bitter. Many families in both communities have lost kin. Although binding up the wounds of war should be the first priority, there is always a danger that revenge killings take place. Logically, the establishment of social cohesion — that is, an ongoing process of developing a community of shared values and opportunities based on a sense of trust, hope and reciprocity — should be the prime aim of government policy. However, there are small groups of violent individuals who may be ready to kill for revenge or to get rid of rivals.



Therefore, the Office to the UN, Geneva, of the Association of World Citizens has sent a three-point appeal to the President of Sri Lanka, Mr Mahinda Rajapaksa:



1) calling for the respect of international humanitarian law as expressed in the Red Cross Geneva Conventions;



2) appealing for the protection of all civilians both during the on-going conflict and especially in the period following the end of armed conflict during which there is a danger of revenge killings. We are sure that Sri Lanka will respect universally-recognized human rights standards;



3) appealing further that serious consultations on the governmental and administrative structures of the State be undertaken so as to facilitate national unity based on the respect of individual views and aspirations.



Wide support for these three aims would be welcome. Letters could be sent to the Permanent Representative of Sri Lanka to the United Nations in New York:

H.E. H.M.G.S. Palikakkara

Permanent Mission of Sri Lanka

630 Third Ave.

New York, NY 10017, USA





Rene Wadlow, Representative to the United Nations, Geneva, Association of World Citizens
At 10:05am on December 1, 2008, THUSHARA WITHARANA said…
Ramu,

We join as a group & we try to make peace in Sri Lanka.We are graduates in peace & Conflict Resolution.we study about peace.But here is a war.

Sri Lankan government and LTTE members fight in northern areas.So tamil people in northern areas face most of dificulties.Not only tamil or northern people bit also southern people face bomb attacks.


So we think we have a responsibility.And we join as a group.we need some help.we need knowladge and small fund.

can U help us.plz reply me.or can U give me details about helping organization plz send me.

Thanks

Thushara
At 3:13pm on November 24, 2008, THUSHARA WITHARANA said…
hi Ramu,

I think U intrest in peace.i'm a graduate in Peace & conflict Resolution in University of Kelaniya In Sri lanka.Then i studied in Internatioan Relations,Human Rigts,Counselling Psycology Diplomas.my last job is Youth national coordinator in anty war front in Sri Lanka.
Now i work in Human rights NGO.We help marginalized people in Sri lankan Conflict.
So we can share our peace knowledge

So I like read Ur view bbout peace.If U have any free time plz join my discussions in my page.
U R welcome

Thushara
At 10:11pm on November 19, 2008, Rene Wadlow said…
I am pleased to send you an article on the need for reconciliation bridge-builders in areas of tensions and conflicts as in eastern Congo. Just as world citizens had pushed in the 1950s for the creation of UN Forces with soldiers specially prepared for peace-keeping service, so now we are again pushing for a new type of world civil servant. India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal have all contributed actively to military-peacekeeping forces. Perhaps these same countries can take a lead in forming reconciliation teams. Your support and advice would be most appreciated. With best wishes, Rene Wadlow

East Congo — Need for Reconciliation Bridge-Builders

Rene Wadlow



On bridges are stated the limits in tons

of the loads they can bear.

But I’ve never yet found one that can bear more

than we do.

Although we are not made of roman freestone,

nor of steel, nor of concrete.

From “Bridges” – Ondra Lysohorsky

Translated from the Lachian by Davis Gill.



Violence is growing in the eastern areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo, basically the administrative provinces of North and South Kivu. The violence could spread to the rest of the country as Angolan troops may come to the aid of the Central Government as they have in the past while Rwandan and Ugandan troops are said to be helping the opposing militia led by Laurent Nkunda. While Nkunda and his Congress for the Defense of the People (CNDP) say that they are only protecting the ethnic Tutsi living in Congo, Nkunda could emerge as a national opposition figure to President Joseph Kabila, who has little progress to show from his years in power.



There is high-level recognition that violence in Congo could spread, having a destabilizing impact on the whole region. UN diplomats, led by Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon, have stressed that a political solution — not a military one — is the only way to end the violence, and they are urging the presidents of Congo, Rwanda, Uganda, Burundi, Kenya and Tanzania to work together to restore stability. The instability, along with Congo’s vast mineral and timber riches have drawn in neighboring armies who have joined local insurgencies as well as local commanders of the national army to exploit the mines and to keep mine workers in near-slavery conditions.



The United Nations has some 17,000 peacemakers in Congo (MONUC), the UN’s largest peacekeeping mission, but their capacity is stretched to the limit. Recently, the General in command of the UN forces, Lieutenant General Vicent Diaz de Villegas of Spain resigned his post after seven weeks — an impossible task. Their mission is to protect civilians, some 250,000 of which have been driven from their homes since the fighting intensified in late August 2008. The camps where displaced persons have been living have been attacked both by government and rebel forces — looting, raping, and burning. UN under-secretary general for peacekeeping, Alain Le Roy, is asking for an additional 3,000 soldiers, but it is not clear which states may propose troops for a very difficult mission. While MONUC has proven effective at securing peace in the Ituri district in north-eastern Congo, it has been much less successful in the two Kivu provinces.



The eastern area of Congo is the scene of fighting at least since 1998 — in part as a result of the genocide in neighboring Rwanda in 1994. In mid-1994, more than one million Rwandan Hutu refugees poured into the Kivus, fleeing the advance of the Tutsi-led Rwandan Patriotic Front, now become the government of Rwanda. Many of these Hutu were still armed, among them, the “genocidaire” who a couple of months before had led the killings of some 800,000 Tutsi and moderate Hutu in Rwanda. They continued to kill Tutsi living in the Congo, many of whom had migrated there in the 18th century.



The people in eastern Congo have lived together for many centuries and had developed techniques of conflict resolution, especially between the two chief agricultural lifestyles: that of agriculture and cattle herding. However, the influx of a large number of Hutu, local political considerations, a desire to control the wealth of the area — rich in gold, tin and tropical timber — all these factors have overburdened the local techniques of conflict resolution and have opened the door to new, negative forces interested only in making money and gaining political power.



UN peace-keeping troops are effective when there is peace to keep. What is required today in eastern Congo is not so much more soldiers under UN command, than reconciliation bridge-builders, persons who are able to restore relations among the ethnic groups of the area. The United Nations, national governments, and non-governmental organizations need to develop bridge-building teams who can help to strengthen local efforts at conflict resolution and re-establishing community relations. In the Kivus, many of the problems arise from land tenure issues. With the large number of people displaced and villages destroyed, it may be possible to review completely land tenure and land use issues.



World citizens were among those in the early 1950s who stressed the need to create UN peace-keeping forces with soldiers especially trained for such a task. Today, a new type of world civil servant is needed — those who in areas of tension and conflict can undertake the slow but important task of restoring confidence among peoples in conflict, establishing contacts and looking for ways to build upon common interests.



Rene Wadlow, Representative to the United Nations, Geneva, Association of World Citizens
 
 
 

Sponsored Link

Please Pay What You Can to Support PCDN

Please consider Paying What You Can to help PCDN grow. We encourage you to consider any amount from $1 and up. Read the SUPPORT page prior to making a payment to see PCDN's impact and how your payment will help.

Sponsored Link

Translate This Page



PCDN NETWORK TWITTER FEED

PCDN Guidelines and Share Pages

By using this site you're agreeing to the terms of use as outlined in the community guidelines (in particular PCDN is an open network indexed by Google and users should review the privacy options). Please note individual requests for funding or jobs are NOT permitted on the network.

Click BELOW to share site resources Bookmark and Share
or Share on LINKEDIN


FOLLOW PCDN on TWITTER, FACEBOOK or GOOGLE+

Google+

 

Latest Activity

TechChange posted a blog post
27 minutes ago
Markus Forsberg posted events
30 minutes ago
Craig Zelizer liked Maha Hilal's discussion Humanitarian Affairs Advisor - Oxford Road, Manchester
1 hour ago
Maha Hilal posted discussions
1 hour ago
Profile IconSarah Ludwig, Magnus Bucht, Sam Dilliway and 10 more joined Peace and Collaborative Development Network
1 hour ago
Craig Zelizer shared Andreas Fiorino's discussion on Facebook
3 hours ago
Craig Zelizer liked Andreas Fiorino's discussion Job: Advisor for the regional measure Strengthening the Social Participation of Palestinian Refugees
3 hours ago
Jillian Post shared jonathan power's discussion on Facebook
3 hours ago

© 2014   Created by Craig Zelizer.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service